A-level results live: Students learn about grades as they are warned of increased competition for university places |  A level

A-level results live: Students learn about grades as they are warned of increased competition for university places | A level

A-level results live: Students learn about grades as they are warned of increased competition for university places |  A level

Speaking on BBC Breakfast, the education secretary has said the “majority” of students will get their first choice university place, and are not being crowded out by a deferred cohort.

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When asked if deferred applications would lead to more competition for university places, James Cleverly said: “We should remember that there has been an increase in the number of courses, and as you say the number of 18-year-olds has been increasing, but so has the number of university courses.”

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Cleverly said that the number of deferments as a percentage of the overall applications is “very low, something around 6.5% from memory” and said students are “predominantly” competing with “other people that took exams this year” meaning the vast majority of university places will be for students who have sat exams this year.

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Cleverly added that there had been a “tighter set of results than last year” with the return of exams, but said: “We have got to remember that the majority of students will probably be getting into their first choice institution, that is incredibly good news.”

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Key events

We want to hear from dropouts, teachers, and parents about their experience with the results of this cohort.

Whatever your story and whatever your next destination, please contact us here.

Education Secretary says ‘majority’ of students will get first-choice university places

Speaking on BBC Breakfast, the education secretary said the ‘majority’ of students will get their first place at university and they will not be squeezed out by a delayed cohort.

When asked if deferred applications would lead to greater competition for university places, James Cleverly said: ‘We have to remember that there has been an increase in the number of courses and, as you say, the number of 18-year-olds has increased, but so has the number of university courses.

Cleverly stated that the number of deferrals as a percentage of all applications is “very low, something about 6.5% from memory” and said students are “mostly” competing with “other people who have taken exams this year”, meaning the vast majority of university places will be reserved for students who have taken exams this year.

Cleverly added that there had been a ‘tighter set of results than last year’ with the return of exams, but said: ‘We must remember that the majority of students are likely to enter their first choice institution, this is incredibly good news.”

According to PA News, the total number of students accepted into UK courses is down 2% from the same point last year, with 425,830 places so far, according to initial figures from Ucas.

Hello. Today, students from England, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man will receive their A-level grades.

Pupils leaving school this year are the first to take the actual exams since 2019, with the Covid disruption leading to previous years receiving teacher-assessed grades.

Earlier this week, the head of the universities’ admissions department said this year’s results “would never be painless” as students had to prepare for lower grades and increased competition for university places.

Ucas chief executive Clare Marchant said the government’s policy of containing grade inflation in order to gradually bring results back to pre-pandemic levels, had been necessary but it was “not easy”.

You can read more about how some students struggled as Results Day approached here.

We’ll bring you the latest updates and reactions on this story throughout the day.

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