Extract: Ixion, when space opera and survival come together with talent

Extract: Ixion, when space opera and survival come together with talent

Extract: Ixion, when space opera and survival come together with talent

And that’s it, it’s won. By dint of screwing everything up, Humanity has been expelled from its own planet. Its only survival is in Tiqqun, an orbital station in the shape of a giant ring, which will have to travel through the stars, in the hope of finding refuge, but also of traces of other human civilizations, probably hidden around the bend. from a distant solar system. For that, it will be necessary to arrange our vessel in colony in perpetual expansion, with the manner of a manager of large gasworks. Because what immediately strikes in the game of Bulwark Studios, a small British team to whom it owes the tactical Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus as a trial run, is its way of organizing and sublimating its play space as a most fascinating anthill to watch, which we find ourselves phasing in on its many details and other chidated animations as it is produced in front of a large aquarium. The very appearance of the station and its interior, circular and convex (areas of construction in the shape of a pie chart that are gradually unlocked as you progress) is also reminiscent of the memory of a certain Startopia, a real nugget of the genre of which we find here a certain descent, certainly more hard-SF and less sassy, ​​but just as charming.

Tiqqun alone holds and the others will hold

No time to yawn to the crows though. Because Ixion is more in the wake of a Frostpunk than a city ​​builder old school. Our station may be able to make superluminal jumps to visit other places in the galaxy, each of these links damages the integrity of its hull. And if it falls to 0, all is lost. We will have to build a whole industry on the fly, made up of furnaces and factories to slowly reconstitute this hull, in order to guarantee another leap. To do this, you have to probe the asteroids you encounter along the way, in order to drill their metals and convert them into raw materials. But we must also ensure the well-being of our population, by producing enough food to keep them alive, while arbitrating certain social conflicts between certain members of the community on a daily basis, which will have the effect of causing repercussions that are either advantageous be chaotic on our management. We will also have to keep a constant eye on the energy of our boat. If this is lacking by dint of multiplying energy-consuming buildings, it can seriously affect the morale of the troops and thus their fighting spirit to save their skin. We must therefore see each hyperspace jump as an amalgam between the saving gain and the fatal risk: it will come as much to dispense our efforts by a step forward towards new discoveries, but will also weaken the whole balance of this microcosm on the edge of the abyss.

As is, Ixion is first and foremost a narrative experience rather than a purely systemic one. Divided into 5 chapters, constituting an average duration of 25 hours in a straight line, the game will distill many scripted events at the various important crossroads of the scenario. For example, we were able to glimpse the beginning of the third chapter, which began on the arrival of our station in front of a huge carcass of ships scattered in hundreds of debris and floating corpses in the four rooms of the screen. Impossible to know more about the issues of gameplay at this precise moment of the scenario, but one thing was certain: the visual effect was striking. Its developers have also thought about the possibility of an Endless mode, like that of frostpunk. But this one could arrive a little later, after the official release of the game. Release of which we are promised an imminent date, without further details. One thing is certain: given the countless mechanisms and management levers presented by its authors, linked to their hypnotic visions of large-scale watchmaking, Ixion should be watched very closely.

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