Patrick Cantlay hits out at PGA Tour for distance-biased runs, criticizes FedEx Cup playoffs

Patrick Cantlay hits out at PGA Tour for distance-biased runs, criticizes FedEx Cup playoffs

Patrick Cantlay hits out at PGA Tour for distance-biased runs, criticizes FedEx Cup playoffs

Defending FedEx Cup champion Patrick Cantlay has called out the PGA Tour’s week-to-week course choice for being biased by distance, as he said he was surprised the events were about “the most far as possible”.

Despite winning the BMW Championship last year in Caves Valley, which can only be described as a “bomber’s paradise”, Cantlay criticized playing a similar course this year.

Cantlay noticed the similarities between this year’s venue, Wilmington Country Club, and Caves Valley in that they are both “extremely distance biased.”

Patrick Cantlay hits out at PGA Tour for distance-biased runs, criticizes FedEx Cup playoffs

Defending FedEx Cup champion Patrick Cantlay announced PGA Tour course pick

“I don’t think there’s too much strategy on this golf course. I think it’s pretty fair in front of you and similar to last year,’ Cantlay said ahead of his title defense, via Golf week.

“The venues between last year and this year are actually very similar, I think, in golf style.

‘I’m so surprised that [the Tour hasn’t] understood,” he added. “It just seems like we’re getting more and more of the same bomb golf courses as far as you can go week after week.”

Measuring 7,534 yards, the par 71 course features three front nine-par-fours that are over 490 yards, while the back two-par-fives are over 600 yards.

Cantlay is 'surprised' to choose the bombing courses as far as you can have always been chosen

Cantlay won at Caves Valley last year but criticized playing a similar course this week

Cantlay said he was surprised the Tour didn’t choose to play tighter courses to combat the number of heavy hitters.

‘It’s so surprising to me that the golf courses that none of the guys that hit far, they don’t go to Hilton Head, they don’t go to Colonial, they don’t go to the little, little dogleggy tree-course bordered golf courses,” he said.

“The way we fight distance, the way these architects seem to think they want to fight distance, is by taking out all the trees and playing 7,600 yards and putting the tees back and all the par-5 are 600 yards away. I don’t think that makes sense.

“I’m surprised every time I come to a golf course where they say it’s been redone recently and there’s not really any golf shot shaping. It’s just how far can you hit it and catch your driver on each hole and hit it as high and hit it as far as you can.

Cantlay said he was surprised the PGA Tour (photo by commissioner Jay Monahan) didn't choose to play tighter courses to combat the number of heavy hitters.

Cantlay said he was surprised the PGA Tour (photo by commissioner Jay Monahan) didn’t choose to play tighter courses to combat the number of heavy hitters.

“If you can hit it 315 yards, you’ve knocked out all the bunkers, and you might be in the rough, but it’s much better in the rough with a 9 or 8 iron than it is in the fairway with a 5 iron. if you were to lie down on the oily part of the fairway before the bunkers.

Cantlay, along with Jon Rahm, also criticized the FedEx Cup, saying the playoffs are not compatible with golf.

He said: “Well, (the playoff format has) changed so many times that I’m not sure anyone has the perfect formula yet.” I am not sure. It’s hard to make playoffs in golf. I think we’ve seen that.

The American, along with Jon Rahm (pictured), also criticized the FedEx Cup qualifiers

The American, along with Jon Rahm (pictured), also criticized the FedEx Cup qualifiers

‘I’m not really sure. I think there must be smarter people than me who have more experience in this than – it seems to get changed every year, and I don’t necessarily know why. We went to everyone starts at a different score to tie a few years ago. It still seems strange to me.

“As I said, the playoffs are obviously a challenge in golf, and I’m not sure anyone has understood that, the perfect formula at the moment.”

The playoff format has drawn criticism in the past from high-profile players including Cantlay and former world No. 1 Rahm, but this year it’s a bit more impactful.

This year’s FedEx Cup events unfold under golf’s dark cloud as the PGA Tour continues to grapple with the threat of LIV Golf.

The threat of LIV Golf (pictured by CEO Greg Norman) looms over the FedEx Cup playoffs this year

The threat of LIV Golf (pictured by CEO Greg Norman) looms over the FedEx Cup playoffs this year

The Saudi-backed breakaway has already lured some of the sport’s biggest stars with the promise of a new format – and lucrative deals.

The offer of 54 holes, team competitions and non-cutting events has already caused the defection of Phil Mickelson, Bryson DeChambeau and Brooks Koepka.

The ongoing civil war led PGA loyalists to hold a crucial meeting Tuesday in Wilmington, Delaware, not far from the site of this week’s BMW Championship.

A crucial meeting between PGA Tour players, led by Tiger Woods, took place on Tuesday

A crucial meeting between PGA Tour players, led by Tiger Woods, took place on Tuesday

The three-and-a-half-hour meeting, led by Tiger Woods, was reportedly aimed at getting PGA Tour players to agree as the fightback against the Saudi-backed rebel event gathers momentum. magnitude.

Asked about the meeting before the meeting, Cantlay joked, “Well, I heard Tiger was the new commissioner, right?” That’s what everyone said.

“I’m going to the meeting. I’ll listen to what it’s all about, and I’ll probably have more for you later.

The encounter was rated as ‘good’ by one player, as reported ESPN, and suggestions will now be raised with PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan.

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